Scouting's National Honor Society

2014 Lodge Advisers’ Summit

lodge_adviser_patchThe 2014 Southern Region Lodge Advisers’ Summit will be held on August 8 – 10 at the Huntsville Marriott hotel, on the grounds of the U.S. Space and Rocket Center.  This program will be completely different than the National Lodge Adviser Training Seminar (NLATS) or other such conferences for advisers.  Rather than focusing on “how to become a better adviser”, we will focus on the process of “how to become a better lodge”.

Some of our Southern Region Lodges have exemplary programs, and yet most have at least a few specific issues that challenge their goal of maintaining a quality Order of the Arrow program within their council.  This summit will leverage the strength and proven ideas of our best programs as we explore development of the process, not only the “how’s” – how do you do it, but also the “why’s” – why is that important, in developing a consistent, quality OA program that each member can be proud to be a part of.

Our weekend program will begin at 7:30 PM on Friday, August 8, and end by 11:00 AM on Sunday, August 10.  The summit fee of $285 will include housing (2 advisers per room) at the Huntsville Marriott for 2 nights, meals on Saturday and Sunday breakfast, summit materials and conference room fees.  Note that no meal will be served Friday night, so plan to eat on your own prior to arrival.

The Huntsville Marriott is only about 5 miles from the Huntsville International Airport (HSV) for those who choose to fly.  Shuttle transportation from and to the airport will be provided.  For those driving, the Huntsville Marriott is on I-565, right off of I-65.

Each Southern Region Lodge should send their current Lodge Adviser, or, if your lodge will transition to a new Lodge Adviser during late 2014 or 2015, the upcoming Adviser should be the one to attend.  Only one adviser per lodge will be allowed to attend due to limitations of our hotel and meeting space.

Online registration is open now; please click on this link to proceed:  http://reservations.scouting.org/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x3374557f4

Once you’ve registered, you should be directed to a page to pay the registration fee online.  If you do not see this, please contact our Region Staff Adviser, Brian Glass.

Play-by-Play: The Mechanics of Journey to Excellence

JTE is one of many three letter acronyms that’s heard all the time in the Order and in Scouting, too. But what is JTE and why is it important in lodge and chapter operations? Our March 2014 Play-by-Play Guide has the answers.

When the Boy Scouts of America launched the new strategic plan, a transition was made to Journey to Excellence, a new program to measure unit, district, and council performance. Following the Boy Scout’s transition, the national Order of the Arrow committee adopted the Journey to Excellence program to replace the National Quality Lodge program. Journey to Excellence (JTE) places emphasis on continuous improvement. Just as the Boy Scouts of America Journey to Excellence program recognizes each level of the organization (unit, district, council), the OA’s program creates Journey to Excellence recognition for chapters, lodges, and sections.

How it works

There are three levels of JTE: bronze, silver, and gold. The bronze requirements, which are similar to the old Quality Lodge requirements, are the minimum indicators of a good lodge program. You will notice that under each content area, the silver and gold requirements increase in difficulty. Lodges earn points for each benchmark they reach. The total number of points accumulated determines the overall rating for the lodge. Lodges receive recognition for their accomplishments for the year, but are also able to see areas for improvement to be addressed in next year’s plan.

The JTE program is focused on continuous improvement rather than reaching some minimum requirements. The program is designed to encourage lodges to improve their program and set annual attainable goals. The process doesn’t stop once the goal is obtained, rather it enables lodges to identify areas for improvement whereas Quality Lodge simply gave lodges a pass or fail grade.

Just like with Quality Lodge, there are requirements for finance, program, membership, council service, leadership and governance. Each of these areas are indicators of how well the lodge is meeting the purpose of the Order and supporting its council.

Finance: The lodge’s financial stability determines their ability to easily execute their annual programs as well as their ability to contribute to their respective council.

Membership: Every lodge needs to experience annual growth but this is just as important as retaining new and old members.

Program: From unit elections to national event attendance, a quality program is how lodges display to the public their hard work, and this can only be accomplished through communication and proper planning on the lodge leadership level.

Council Service: The Order of the Arrow is a brotherhood of cheerful servants. We have received this title through our countless community service hours, but also through our support of local council programs, the primary purpose for which we exist.

Leadership: Developing future leaders is what the Order of the Arrow does best, and this is accomplished through superior training and opportunities to utilize the skills learned in the classroom. Each of these areas has specific requirements for lodges to work toward.

JTE allows chapters, lodges, and sections to analyze their health and program delivery in a quantifiable way. For more information on JTE, visit the JTE Resources Page on oa-bsa.org.

Play-by-Play: The Boys in Blue – Part 2

As Scouting’s National Honor Society, part of our mission is to serve as an integral part of the Boy Scouts of America. In Part 2 of our Play-by-Play Guide on supporting “the boys in blue”, we highlight opportunities to support Cub Scout programming in your district and council:

Cub Scout Program Involvement

Facilitate adult leader training sessions

Arrowmen in Nguttitehen Lodge of the Lincoln Heritage Council recognize that the OA brings together some of the most experienced and tenured leaders in Scouting. Therefore, the lodge hosts training sessions for new Cub Scout leaders and parents. These sessions, led by youth Arrowmen and facilitated by adult advisers, help orient leaders and parents as they get involved in Scouting.

Host a fun fall event

Halloween is a great time to engage new Cub Scouts and get them excited about a whole year of Scouting adventures. Arrowmen in lodges throughout the country work alongside Cub Scouts at annual “Pumpkin’ Chunkin'” events, teaching Scout skills like lashing and knot tying while building a catapult. Then the real fun ensues – for both Arrowmen and Cub Scouts: using the catapults to “chunk” pumpkins as far as they can.  Other lodges host a “Spookoree”, a Halloween themed event where Cub Scouts participate in a haunted house, crafts, and spooky games.

Support the pinewood derby

District and council Pinewood Derby races are some of the most highly anticipated events of the year. Work with the event organizers and offer the support of your chapter or lodge at this year’s event. Arrowmen can help in all capacities of the race: at check-in, pit stop maintenance, track setting, and awards. Consider having Arrowmen build a chapter or lodge car or bring their old Cub Scout pinewood derby cars for a “big Scout race”.

Read the February Edition of The Voice

eVoice Feb 2014The February issue of The Voice is now available. Read it now to get the latest headlines from around the region including:

  • A welcome from our new region chief
  • Information about the first NLS and NLATS of the year
  • Learn more about our Play-By-Play web series
  • and more!

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